Ignatia Amara: Extending The Analysis

Riley Coules
June 30, 2017

Note that I write mainly of the Ignatia constitution in this piece, intermingled with “acute” insights. The difference between an Ignatia constitution and someone who embodies an Ignatia condition temporarily–rather, acutely–following some trauma, typically loss or shock oriented, is that Ignatia constitutions in a state of disorder will enter that state naturally (given a wide range of traumas), and will delve further into that state throughout the whole of their lives. Disordered Ignatias will remain Ignatias when healed, except they will embody primarily the positive attributes of the constitution, devoid of all the turmoil that accompanies malady. They are, in effect, Ignatias from birth. Someone who takes on the Ignatia state temporarily certainly has a disposition to do so, but ne may very well be a Lycopodium, Lachesis, Sepia, etc. who just responds to loss or some form of shock like an Ignatia; in which case, that person will exhibit some of the lower qualities associated with the constitution, but they will in many cases be surface-level and won’t speak to the whole of the person. Naturally, more people require Ignatia as an acute remedy than a constitutional one.

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IGNATIA AMARA KEY WORDS: 

sensitive, romantic, idealistic, creative, independent, intellectual, forward-thinking, highly emotional

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The symptoms associated with any constitution will vary both in intensity and makeup as the disease process progresses, snowballing in effect or somewhat differing from their original representations as time (and self-destructive tendencies) advance. The manifestations of disorder Ignatia succumbs to affect the mind and spirit heavily, perhaps more than most remedy types, because of nir deeply emotional nature (Ignatia is comprised mainly of water, as is Phosphorus; Sulphur contains mostly fire and air, and Arsenicum earth and fire, respectively (Bailey 407-408). These distinctions apply to the comparison outlined next to the asterisk). When I first began to assume a heavy Ignatia emotional state–beyond that which I encountered when mildly disharmonized in high school–I remember isolating myself, becoming very non-communicative, and in general desiring to escape the presence of others, even though I deeply yearned for connection. As time went on, however, I grew suicidal; baseline depression had metamorphosed into hysteria, characterized by a grievous disruption in the operation of my mind and body. At that point, I not only desired to escape other people, I desired to escape my own life because of my severe emotional detachment to its value. Throughout treatment, I began to pick up on this odd feeling that although I was so grateful to regain my health, I didn’t feel it. Arsenicum had allowed me to relinquish some of the control that had controlled me for years, yet I still could not immerse myself in the present tense. I thus began to attribute disconnection to a deeply-disordered Ignatia condition, wherein the ability to experience the self, life, and others is seriously disturbed; unfortunately, alienation on every level follows*.

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The emotions of Ignatia are so powerful, so central to the rhythm of the individual that holds them, that when they are unknowingly stifled, Ignatia’s interpretation of the world around nem lacks meaning, grit. Numbness replaces zest for experience, and former joys prompt the reflection something’s missing here [the ability to live in the moment]. Before becoming seriously depressed, and even back in high school to some degree–when I was rather happy–I questioned why certain scenarios didn’t feel the same anymore; spending time with my family members, the holidays, etc. lacked a bit of the magic they had always possessed (when I fell deeply ill, no magic prevailed). I would imagine many people can identify with this mindset, which is why we so often desire to return to the simplicity of our youth. Yet we’re not missing simplicity, rather purity in perception; maturity doesn’t incite cynicism, disharmony does. And this state of being manifests, of course, out of suppressed emotion, for most of us are not wholly feeling the emotion of life, whether we realize it or not. Loss in particular induces the Ignatia emotional detachment; that loss may occur in the form of a loved one, a former lifestyle, or the self. In the latter context, the added element of the unknown source aids heavily in Ignatia’s strife: following some traumatic incident, members of this constitution will generally be very aware of why they feel so empty, and will desperately grasp at whatever they have been forced to relinquish in order to feel whole again. By the time I saw a homeopath, however, I had no idea why I couldn’t feel life anymore, or in some ways, that I wasn’t; loss of my initial lifestyle upon moving to New York, loss of my grandmother, loss of my health and my identity to the utmost degree, had all become so confounded I could no longer remember who I was or what I was missing.

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As I write in The Altered Personality, an Ignatia constitution, like any constitution, may be “disordered” without knowing it. If we define trauma as anything that permanently impresses disorder on the vital force, we realize that many traumas are, in fact, minute. Ignatias–again, like most people–may become disharmonized, say, from food poisoning, and not even recognize the alteration to their overall well-being. They may become a bit gassy thereafter (perhaps indicating a mild, mild case of SIBO), have totally manageable headaches (which they will further suppress with allopathic drugs), or get imperturbably constipated with different facets of their hormonal cycles, but none of these bodily complications will cause enough of a stink to make Ignatia types think, “Oh, I need to be healed”–unless, of course, they know about homeopathy. Mentality-wise, Ignatias will enjoy their food a little bit more, perhaps gain a bit of pudge as a result, and become more reactionary when they feel they have been crossed. The aforementioned apply to my high school self when, once again, I considered myself rather happy! Like most members of our veiled society, it is not until Ignatia constitutions suffer a major blow to homeostasis (think the loss I refer to above) that they will seek help, or even realize anything is “wrong” in the first place. Ignatias aren’t out of touch, they’re just not as inclined to worry as Arsenicums when minutely disordered** (although few people are as inclined to worry as Arsenicums when minutely disordered), nor are they generally aware of their powers to detect the slightly awry–the emotionally awry, that is–which is not a reflection of their inadequacies but those of the left-brained Western civilization they may unintentionally subscribe to. For if Ignatias were listening, if they were inclined to respond to the cues their vital forces express to them at any stage of the disease process, they would realize the “lack of magic” they naturally detect, being a highly emotional type, equates to sentiments they can no longer feel.

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When I arrived at Fordham, the magic I have highlighted henceforth began to dissipate; devastation doesn’t even begin to describe my sorrow upon leaving home, which swelled throughout the course of the semester until it burst. My grandma, my second mother, died a few months into the second semester, followed by a bad break-up, and I, well, snapped (note that one in an Ignatia state is liable to “snap like a twig” with each subsequent trauma). I had some physical issues suddenly come to fruition–not uncoincidentally–from which the magic ceased to exist and I began my heaviest decline, this time “in the negative”. When I did eventually see my homeopath a year and a half later, utterly broken by real turmoil, I lacked personality, a sense of self. At that point my emotions were so suppressed, my livelihood so far gone, that I forgot how greatly these incidents had impacted me, in fact romanticizing Fordham because the present tense was so defunct! In general: the smaller the trauma, the less likely we are to notice the amiss; the greater the trauma, and thus the greater effect on the body and mind, the increased likelihood that we will grasp our abnormalities, and furthermore where they stem from. Interestingly, if enough time passes without healing from some initial large force, and with enough troubles in between, Ignatia specifically may minimize the impact of nir past, and in fact view some affairs with rose-colored glasses in order to negate the sorrow of now. Escapism can occur with other remedy types, certainly, and in different forms; for example, many young women and men have been sexually assaulted without acknowledging the incident until years later (so is the power of suppressed emotion). The difference between Ignatia constitutions and other types is that the former actively seeks out the rapture, that delight, which once made them feel complete.

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Ignatias may be overwhelmed by loss, shock, grief, or disappointment first and foremost, but their avoidant coping mechanisms may extend to sentiments of other remedies, and therefore sustain the infliction of disease associated with those remedies (a typical facet of the “interwoven complex” of one’s constitutional make-up). For instance, Phosphorus types fear rejection, and often run from negativity–but need the comfort of company to ease their pain, both on a mental and physical level. Thus, self-imposed isolation (Ignatia) not only enabled me to forgo life experience, it tarnished, and suppressed, my yearn for human contact (Phosphorus). Furthermore, my reactions to certain circumstances mirrored the behaviors associated with all of my constitutions–once again, the interwoven complex at play. The first night I took Ignatia, one of my good friends and I had a marked falling out moment due to feelings she failed to express to me. I isolated myself so much throughout the year and a half prior; I was no longer there for the people I loved (although, to be fair, neither were many of them for me. No one could be there for me because I wasn’t even there for myself). At that moment, I wanted to escape, to go it alone–I knew rejection was coming. I told myself I just couldn’t handle it; while I feared the physical anxiety associated with healing (Phosphorus), I was ultimately afraid to manage the ramifications of her words–i.e. the hurt I knew she would cause me (Phosphorus, Ignatia). Ignatias put all their eggs in a basket, idealizing loved ones and succumbing to grief when forms of betrayal inevitably manifest out of the human propensity to make mistakes; Phosphorus would rather dip than cope. The way I handled my friend’s rejection very much mirrored Ignatia: isolation, non-communication, resentment, and an inability to manage the pain I felt due to the loss of someone I loved, someone I had trusted to epitomize the humanity Phosphorus holds so dear. (Phosphorus is perhaps my innermost constitution, Ignatia more extraneous.)

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While emotional detachment may suppress needs associated with different facets of an individual’s constitution, it can also aid in the exacerbation of the lower self, the modes through which lowly sentiments of other remedies are expressed. For example, Arsenicum is highly irritable. This irritability is often brought on by an extreme sensitivity to burdensome external impressions, which other people may in fact perpetuate. Because I was not connecting with others, because I was so far gone emotionally due to my bodily distress, I could no longer hold a conversation or engage with those I am akin to. Detachment brought on by an Ignatia state amplified my irritable tendencies, as I could not see my loved ones for who they were, no matter how hard I tried; thus, I was even more inclined toward frustration when they provoked my lower self. I failed to grasp the emotion that had always guided me toward them, something that would otherwise abate my agitation… Even when I had finished with Ignatia, and still had Arsenicum left to go, I wasn’t as perturbed by scenarios I would normally criticize. Moreover, detachment amplified my suicidal disposition brought on by fear, a quality unique to Arsenicum; the only vision at the time that could bring me back down to reality was what would happen if I actually ended my own life. I knew my constant ruminations were incredibly misguided, but I couldn’t feel how… I yearned to escape my body, but also didn’t care enough to fight anymore. The aforementioned premises indicate that healing with one remedy–in effect, healing one facet of an individual’s constitution–may aid in the pacification of others, even as they remain defunct, for the uplifting of some parts inevitably touches the lower selves associated with all.

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For the majority of my healing, I not only imposed isolation on myself, but circumstances naturally forced solitude upon me–namely, the absence of my parents. It’s almost as if things were meant to be this way, that I was meant to struggle so much on my own; in 2015, my dad started working in our hometown just outside of Detroit while my mom attempted to sell the house. Then my grandpa had two strokes in early 2016, and she moved there (while I stayed in Chicago) to take care of him. We clashed a bit on her necessary leave; while I did not realize it at the time, because I brushed all outside sources of negativity aside (I was barely “contriving my reality” well enough dealing with the internal), I desperately needed her. Anyway you look at it, the lack of physical support–i.e., her presence–contributed to my suffering. It’s not her fault; it’s life. But even though I knew I couldn’t blame her, I was frustrated with the situation, which she was naturally involved in. We had a rather heated fight over the issue during Thanksgiving while I healed with Ignatia; my first thought was, “I’m just going to have to go home” when we failed to resolve our confrontation–in part because I wanted to “show her” (Ignatia), but also because that’s what I always did: run (Phosphorus). But I didn’t want to be alone, really alone, because then my thoughts would catch up with me, and I had just started to recognize my cravings for human interaction. So I stayed, and carried on, and something extraordinary happened: I discovered a phantom part of my psyche I had never before possessed awareness of, namely my inadvertent capacity to emotionally manipulate. I’m not talking serious, or even really intentional (intent being key in the fruition of subliminal motives) manipulation, but the kind that prevents Ignatia from growing if the constitution continues to protect the self instead of turning nir healing powers outward. For in my chagrin for the very human mistakes of others, I blacklisted those that would otherwise compel me to expand my awareness and consequently my tolerance for the main mechanism by which we all learn. And that mechanism is, simply put, by making mistakes. Indeed, if I consistently push away those that engage in a very necessary facet of the learning process, I inhibit my own growth by denying my role in the circumstances at hand. For even if one did onto me an act entirely nefarious, I must always have something to learn; few in this lifetime will harm me just to do harm, but many more will commit an ill-deed as we grow together. So the test of Ignatia, then, is not to shut off the heart in order to protect it, but to open it up to an infinite amount of understanding.

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*While all constitutions will feel disconnected in one way or another when rather disordered (even Phosphorus, who craves interaction, will not wholly feel life because nir emotions are suppressed), Ignatia’s disconnection tends to be far intenser and far more expansive because the type is so emotional. More rational, “fiery” constitutions like Sulphur will not notice such a dramatic change in their sentimental welfare when healing, depending on where they start, because they are so oblivious to how they feel, preferring to philosophize or intellectualize most affairs; even when well, Sulphurs tend to lack introspection. Phosphorus constitutions are comprised mainly of water like Ignatias, but their emotions are somewhat more “superficial”–that is, surface-level–because Phosphorus types react so heavily to their environment and thus oscillate in accordance to its “vibes”. Ignatia types’ feelings, on the other hand, run deep, and originate from within them, regardless of how others are feeling.

Because Ignatias are less responsive to other people, or even beautiful, grand schemas like Phosphorus persons, they are less able to pull themselves out of their woe. Phosphorus types also live a little bit more in la-la land than Ignatias, allowing the former to escape the sorrow of now easier. A healthier tendency, or even “gift” of Phosphorus constitutions when rather well, is to work through their lower emotions via their extreme idealization and connection to the spiritual realm. Ignatias, whose outlooks are a bit more “grounded”, are somewhat gloomier (when disordered) in this respect.

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**I just thought I’d clarify for anyone who has read either of my two pieces on Arsenicum constitutions: Arsenicums who have yet to be tested by life’s hardships, or who are ignorant to their own mental or physiological distress, will not worry–but if they are aware that something is wrong, even slightly wrong, they will. Remember that is control that equates to security for this constitution.

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The Constitutional Ignatia:

in health: DEPTH, REFINEMENT, SENSITIVITY

when imbalanced: DOMINANT, TOUCHY, SELF-PROTECTIVE

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Ignatias, when whole, are generally:

  • highly refined. In fact, the first impression one may get from an Ignatia constitution is just how refined ne is. With “…a natural authority which comes from an unusual degree of self-possession coupled with a very sharp intellect” (Bailey 82), some Ignatias may even be predisposed to the “resting bitch face”, which is usually more deceiving than it is an accurate representation of the constitution’s feelings toward others. In reality, Ignatia’s sense of dignity arises out of nir intense opposition to vulgarity of all kinds; the remedy type feels the ugliness of lower, derogatory mentalities profoundly. Ignatias expect the respect of human decency.
  • robust. Traditional homeopathic literature cites Ignatia as being “the most powerful of the female types” (Bailey 82), or even “the feminine of the masculine” (unknown source but found here). Considering that women are just as strong as men inherently, I find these characterizations to be fundamentally flawed. While there are plenty of Ignatia men, the large majority of them are female. This ratio will level out as women reject their secondary status as the weaker link, the conquested, the nurturing, the helpless more and more; as men are allowed to express their emotions, intuit, nurture, and be helped more and more; and as both sexes are permitted to act freely based on the devices of their uncorrupted personalities, and consequent uncorrupted motives, not the norms of the society in which they live. For as strong as Ignatia types are, they are liable to, once again, “snap like a twig” when disordered due to their highly emotional nature. More on that below.
  • primarily emotional. Ignatia types feel the world more vividly than most, relishing in the enchantment of sheer vitality, which explains why they succumb so heavily to lows when they are depressed, their moods changeable. A particularly-passionate sort of ambition allows them to thrust their emotional welfare into their career choices, as does a desire to defy gender roles. (Despite the irrelevance of dubbing Ignatias “the strongest of the female types”–we might as well just call them the strongest of all types–it is pretty cool that the strongest type can also be one of the most emotional.) Disordered Ignatias tend to seek status as a replacement for their own lack of self-worth; they become highly intellectual (free from the insecurity of emotional responsiveness), ready to trample on anyone (usually men, given our current sociological climate) who inadvertently remind them of former rejections. Dominant and volatile, “masculinized” subtypes of the imbalanced Ignatia instill fear in their coworkers–yet they are still only protecting their hearts, which they are so very out of touch with. 
  • independent. Very independent, and quite often feminists, reformers, and takers of no bullshit. Note the distinction between emotional independence and intellectual independence: Ignatias are not usually emotionally independent (pledging allegiance to their partners and closest friends), although they may certainly evolve beyond such a crutch. Their minds remain free, in any event–Ignatias are, most definitely, free-thinkers and “attracted to the most profound and also the most progressive of ideas” (Bailey 82)–for which they refuse to conform or take on the values of their loved ones.
  • artistic, creative, free-flowing, intuitive and original. As Bailey notes, the intellect figures strongly here, although it is not limited by pure rationality. In fact, it mingles quite nicely with the emotions. Ignatias aren’t irrational like, say, Lachesis types, but they do prefer artistic and intellectual pursuits over the hard sciences–which they may excel at, however, if they so choose. Unhealthy Ignatias definitely fall into the latter category; it is almost certain that the emotionally-suppressed Ignatia will be out of touch with nir intuitive faculties. 
  • sensitive. Ignatia children may witness their detached parents (detached from each other or detached from Ignatia) and feel the sting of rejection strongly. Ignatias need a generous flow of unconditional love to function properly and reach their highest potential; otherwise, they begin to develop frustrating, inhibitive (to themselves and others) defense mechanisms that prevent them from growing, one of which is lashing out anytime someone, unbeknownst to the offender, hits a soft spot! Ignatias have sharp tongues like Arsenicums and Lachesis types, but each constitution can easily be distinguished from one another: Arsenicums are almost purely rational, sometimes limited by their rationality; they rarely show their frustration unless pushed over the edge, withholding any signs of irritation/hurt so that their “coolness” may gain them the upper hand; they may even think themselves above the lower emotions that plague whomever they’re arguing with. Lachesis persons, on the opposite end of the spectrum, detect weakness as easily as Arsenicums, but they are often far too irrational to implement their findings properly. Once they’ve started, it’s hard to stop Lachesis types, as they sting and they sting and they sting until the receiving party at once ceases listening, or even taking them seriously. Sometimes it’s hard to know just what a Lachesis type is berating you for because their anger is so uncontrollable and imprecise. Ignatias fall somewhere in between Arsenicums and Lachesis constitutions: their capacity to be both intellectual and emotional restrains their frustrations to only what must be said to hurt the receiving party, from which they will cut you off in the hopes of forgetting the harm you have effected on them. But what Ignatias are not showing is how damaged they are; Ignatias won’t even know themselves. A healthy Ignatia naturally tells the world ne is not to be pushed around; an unhealthy one puts up a front to ensure you won’t forget it.
  • big on rights of all kinds–be them race rights, women’s rights, animal rights, etc. Ignatias hold themselves to high moral standards, and will become upset with themselves, even falling ill, if they break their moral code. 
  • sociable. Ignatia loves parties, and like Phosphorus, is disposed to make friends easily because ne tends to be so charming. When healthy, Ignatia is poised, self-contained yet friendly, affectionate, graceful, engaging, and sensible. Ne is mutable, yet ne does not waver on nir values. This Ignatia possess an air of strength and self-awareness that those with lower intentions wouldn’t imagine messing with, yet “higher” souls–whose values are in check–won’t feel threatened by.
  • somewhat glamorous. The second subtype of Ignatia will only become more “glamorous”, but desperately so. Even though unhealthy Ignatias may too know their values, they will seek approval by filling their calendars with social events wherein others can tell them how beautiful they are. These Ignatias may exaggerate positive emotions, be utterly “grand”, and name-drop so as though to feel important. Even the workaholic subtype of the Ignatia constitution is really only seeking approval with nir credentials.

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Ignatia in the acute:

INSTABILITY, FRAGILITY, STASIS

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The following pertains to Ignatia when heavily disordered, unless otherwise indicated. Note that these characterizations are also conducive to understanding those in an acute Ignatia state.

  • Ignatia will want to be alone, even if the utter feeling of despair ne assumes stems from the loss of a relationship. It is a contradictory preference, much like other physical and mental symptoms associated with the constitution, in which connection (sometimes to something other than what is lost) is deeply yearned for, yet self-imposed barriers prevent Ignatias from getting what they really want. With this, Ignatias are typically averse to consolation (Kent 16: “Consolation aggravates”), perhaps because Ignatias do not believe they will ever work through their despair; nothing anyone tells them will make recovery a reality. Consolation may even force Ignatia to recognize what ne is going through, which prompts more escapism or alternatively the recognition of burdensome emotions.
  • An Ignatia state can be characterized by disconnectedness; it is a bleak fate in which even the joys of humanity cannot pull members of this constitution out of their sorrow. I cannot convey how utterly heartbreaking this mentality is, especially when one strives to feel again, to connect with those around nir, to relish in the warmth of harmony. The harmony of the vital force serves as a microcosm for the harmony of The Soul, that wholeness, that connectivity that binds us all; but Ignatias, even within the confines of barriers willfully contrived, cannot tear them down. They don’t know how to, for one of two reasons (with some intersectionality in between): if Ignatias cannot fathom where their limitations stem from, how are they to figure out how to rebuild proper foundations, those that allow love and light back into their lives? An utter stifling of how they feel about recent–or even farther back–sufferings may prevent Ignatias from remembering the source of their woe. If Ignatias do understand where their negativity originates, perhaps directly following the event that triggered it, they will not know how to cope with the dismal emptiness of their loss, literally drowning in it. To outsiders, Ignatias may seem a bit dramatic, but their dramatism is largely a facet of their deep emotions, especially regarding those people/circumstances they love, and rarely a show, except for when they want to “show” friends and family how much they’re hurting (!).
  • These individuals are usually either silently brooding or tearful, and will want others to know they are suffering even as they refuse consolation. After some extremely traumatic incident, Ignatias will typically sob uncontrollably, alternating with times of silent grieving, until they transition into a constant numbness. In youth, Ignatias will run up the stairs wailing after any minor slight, beseeching those who have struck a sensitive spot (often the unsuspecting, and perhaps bewildered parents) to recognize how hurt they are by perceived detachment. More evolved, typically older Ignatias will not be given to tantrums, but will want others to acknowledge their anguish all the same. However, note that “hysterical personalities who deliberately do outrageous things to gain attention will not be helped by Ignatia. They require remedies corresponding to more mentally unbalanced types…” (Bailey 86).
  • Ignatias suffer from heavy idealism, which is why loss impacts them so. They put all their eggs in one basket, constructing their emotional world around people and circumstances near and dear to them; when they have to relinquish any one of these joys, it feels as if their entire existence has shattered to pieces, especially if they feel they have been betrayed. And Ignatias may have a tendency to feel betrayed more than most because of their extreme idealization: Coulter notes their “disillusionment in others” (120) from unmet high expectations. Ignatias don’t expect perfection for the sake of perfection like Arsenicums; rather, they seek emotional security in their loved ones. A healthy Ignatia is one who has cultivated nir independence beyond nir intellect, extending to nir capacity to sentimentalize. Ne has not cut nemself off from the world, but does not rely on it for wholeness; instead, such wholeness has been solidified within, and cannot be swayed by external matters because it rests solely upon the firmness of the self.
  • Ignatias may view the world in black and white, and are liable to cut anyone off that harms them. Yet in attempting to protect their hearts, they only alienate themselves further, in effect self-destructing by forgoing what they need most, what rejection reminds them of what they feel they don’t have: love. Ignatias may have felt this restriction of love since early on in their childhood, not only because it existed, but because they were highly sensitive to it… “Ignatia children are particularly susceptible to feelings of abandonment” (Bailey 83). 
  • Ignatias may be quite Scorpio in the way in which they view the world in black and white, and seek to protect themselves by renouncing the offending party when crossed. To this depiction I add that Ignatias sting like the scorpion, not only contriving a wall of protection around their hearts, but actively seeking revenge if particularly damaged, through their words or a “steely silence”(Bailey 83). Although they are not typically violent or cruel, and are usually affectionate creatures, Ignatias are quarrelsome, indignant, and combative when disordered or acutely agitated (both scenarios exacerbate the lower self), especially on matters of morality. This is a type that never forgets a wrong!
  • Ignatias’ “self-imposed barriers” indicate the way in which they consistently stand in their own way of happiness. They want to go on adventures to feel again, but they cannot motivate themselves to do so. They value their relationships, yet they constantly alienate themselves for reasons they remain unaware. For this reason, Ignatia may appear “down and out”. I would never say goodbye to anyone when I left a gathering (prior to my ultimate decline), or make the effort to engage family, and even friends, in conversation if I could avoid it. Typical of this constitutional type, I would also feel like I had personally wronged them by not being involved (remember how strongly morality figures in the mind of Ignatia!).
  • Ignatia types are hard to pin down, and may even appear disinterested to those around them, especially those they do not divulge their feelings to. When suppression turns chronic, their lack of communication will be treated as innate. Failing to keep in contact with loved ones tends to follow their reclusive attitudes.
  • Ignatia types struggle to motivate themselves. Everything feels like effort. Mental processes will slow and dull; Ignatia suffers from brain fog. Furthermore, Ignatia will not want to “try” socially, or verbally, for that matter–I would often find myself with unanswered questions/short answers to other people’s questions, merely because I knew if I started a conversation with someone around me, I’d have to finish it. 
  • Ignatias ruminateover loss, moral wrongs they may make, or any unattainable scenario that would relieve them from their suffering. Ignatias may be stuck in the past.
  • Emotional detachment may lead to stasis: if no satisfaction can be had period, no satisfaction can be attained through growth, unless that growth uplifts some of Ignatia’s depression. Although, the type’s lack of motivation may prevent members from even trying…
  • In the Ignatia depression, time passes slowly. There’s no end in sight to their woe.
  • A preference for distractions may be the Ignatia’s fancy: television, videos, social media, etc. all “satisfy” (but never really, for Ignatia will remain despondent). Even if Ignatia type’s are not fully into their distraction, it helps them take their mind off the heaviness of their melancholia. However, some music, television shows, and movies–if Ignatia can pay attention (severe anxiety prevents one from focusing)– will aggravate symptoms, as they remind Ignatia of former joys that can no longer be felt.
  • When mildly disordered, Ignatias escape by cutting the offending party off via self-protective mechanisms (the aforementioned silence or lash-out), so they don’t have to feel the sting of rejection any longer. Remembering what happens means reliving the pain. When severely disordered, however, Ignatias may escape by seeking the emotions they once were capable of feeling in the past, in effect refusing to deal with their current melancholia. They may idealize former scenarios that didn’t make them that happy but feed into their present suppression nonetheless. Some Ignatia types are inclined to commit suicide, especially when their outlook’s unrelenting blue turns into unrelenting numbness. 
  • Hysteria (both in the mind or medically, when emotional shock evinces physical symptoms) is common, a condition characterized by jumbled thought processes, erratic behavior, silent brooding over oppressive anxiety, heart flutters, a feeling of a lump in the throat that is better when swallowing, insomnia, etc. 
  • Ignatias may laugh at inappropriate times, clench their jaws, or bite the inside of their cheeks as a reflection of their suppressed emotion. They may sigh as they literally breathe out what they cannot feel. 
  • Ignatias may also yawn, particularly in social situations when they can’t get “into it”; once again–suppressed emotion. Disconnection.
  • Ignatias possess very deep, deep emotions of which they struggle to manage, as well as to convey to others (when disordered), both positive and negative. Throughout treatment I remember thinking to myself, this is too much when I started to gain some sense of who I was; I felt so overwhelmed by my reflections of my newfound joy that I simply didn’t know what to do with myself. I’m sure I responded in the very same way to my sorrow.
  • The suppressed emotions associated with Ignatia must be expressed somehow, which is where dreams and vices come in. Ignatia’s dreams are fairly straight-forward (as opposed to Phosphorus’, which are highly symbolic); Ignatias are also known to relish their food.
  • Ignatia can be very changeable, which is perhaps a reflection of stifled emotions bubbling just under the surface, ready to burst at any time (Kent 54, 68: “Inconstancy”, “Mood, changeable”). If not authentically conveyed via the proper outlet, they will manifest outwardly somehow (kind of like the hysteria I mentioned before–a complete and utter rejection of what is actually being felt). Specifically, I was an incredibly impulsive person before Ignatia, in ways I didn’t even realize; I impulsively drove, impulsively ate, impulsively called in sick to work–which always led to frustration and wonderment as to why I was constantly driven into excess. I yearned for balance. Homeopathy (the purveyor of homeostasis) has accomplished this feat for me.

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.PHYSICALITY: Thick, dark, curly hair, which grows in abundance. Dark complexion. Strong-nosed. Some are very slim, with delicate bones; others are prone to weight gain with flabby stomachs. Regardless, the face is often beautifully-structured with high cheekbones, straight, aquiline noses, and strong jaws. The lips are quite characteristic: very full and “delicately contoured like a bow, indicating both emotional intensity and refinement” (Bailey 90).

Ignatia is that feminist type that doesn’t shave and has a lot of hair to show for it. 

EXAMPLES: Philip M. Bailey, M.D. and homeopath, offers a few examples in Homeopathic Psychology: Personality Profiles of the Major Constitutional Remedies: Eleanor Bron and Barbra Streisand.

I have my own archetypes: Maximiliane Hansen & Chloe Morello from YouTube.

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Read more about Ignatia here and here

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Resources:

  1. Bailey, Philip M. Homeopathic Psychology: Personality Profiles of the Major Constitutional Remedies. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic, 1995. Print.
  2. Coulter, Catherine R. Portraits of Homoeopathic Medicines: Psychophysical Analyses of Selected Constitutional Types. Quality Medical Pub., 1997. Print.
  3. Kent, J. T. Repertory of the Homoeopathic Materia Medica. Uttar Pradesh, India: B. Jain Publishers, 2016. Print.
  4. McCabe, Vinton. Let Like Cure Like. St Martins Press, 1997. Print.
  5. McCabe, Vinton. Practical Homeopathy. St Martins Press, 2000. Print.